Mounts

As we get closer to releasing this project things will get tweaked and cleaned up.

There for all the models that you see here on this page are subject to change.

  • All the text on this page was taken from the AD&D 2nd Edition Dark Sun Boxset Books.

Kank

Kanks serve as both herd animals and beasts of burden. They are large insectoids, 4 feet high and 8 feet long, weighing around 400 pounds. As herd animals, kanks are durable and easily tended. Kanks are not raised for their meat, which becomes foul smelling as soon as they die.

Instead, they are raised for honey globules produced on their bellies. A single honey globule can bring 4 bits. As riding beasts, kanks provide effective transportation for a single character (except for halfgiants, who use inix for the same purpose). A kank can carry up to 400 pounds. Kanks used as riding animals also require harnesses and saddles.


Erdlu

Erdlus are herd beasts raised by many different cultures on Athas. These large, flightless birds stand up to seven feet tall and weigh around 200 pounds. Their omnivorous diet allows them to graze nearly anywhere and their hardy nature keeps them alive in harsh terrain. The price of a single erdlu can be as much as double that listed or as little as half, depending upon availability. Erdlu’s eggs are also edible: one egg can fetch 3 bits.


War-Crodlu

The crodlu is a large, flightless drake with weak, clawed forearms. Some are bred and trained to bear humanoids, yet even those are aggressive and unpredictable. A smaller version, the Erdlu, can be ridden by small riders but is too skittish to be trained for war.


Erdland

Erdlands live in the low lying vegetation areas found in the tablelands of Athas. They often make their shelter of some of the larger bushes and trees that grow near the edge of the Ringing Mountains, where the tablelands reach the mountains’ base.

Erdlands gather in much smaller groups than erdlus, usually varying from 10 to 30 in number. Erdlands are omnivorous, eating both animals and vegetables, usually whichever is more readily available. Erdlands rarely hunt for food and so most often eat vegetation for survival, enjoying meat when another animal or creature is found dead. On occasion, erdlands will hunt; they are fairly competent when doing so.

Erdland greatly enjoy eating esperweed, a flowering plant that causes an increase in the psionic powers of those who eat it. Though they normally possess no psionic ability, when they eat esperweed, erdlands gain the psionic abilities described above. This ability lasts only for a short time, just one turn, and thus, it is very rare that adventurers will encounter a psionic erdland.

Erdlands, like erdlus, produce young by laying eggs, the size of which can often be as large as 3 feet in diameter. Erdland eggs are somewhat less tasty than erdlu eggs, but can provide food for as many as three adult human or demi humans. Erdland eggs are incubated underground, in small wells dug by the egg bearer. During the day, the dirt and mud walls of these wells grow very moist and hot, due to the searing heat of the Athasian sun.

Egg bearing erdlands will often dig three or four of these wells, all within an area approximately 30 feet in diameter. Whenever one of these egg wells is threatened by another creature (man or otherwise), the egg bearer will attack the threat viciously in order to protect its young.


Crodlu

The crodlu is a large, flightless drake with weak, clawed forearms. Some are bred and trained to bear humanoids, yet even those are aggressive and unpredictable. A smaller version, the Erdlu, can be ridden by small riders but is too skittish to be trained for war.


Inix

An inix is a large lizard animal that grows to as much as 16 feet long. Each can carry up to 2000 pounds. Though herbivorous by nature, inix are vicious combatants, attacking with both tail and bite.
Inix trained for riding are also trained not to fight while mounted, for no rider could manage to keep his seat while an inix thrashed its mighty tail.

Inix can be fitted with a howdah. Half-giants use them as individual mounts. Inix cannot generally pull wagons because of their lengthy tails.


Beetle

Beetles…


Basilisk

These reptilian monsters all posses a gaze that enables them to turn any fleshy creature to stone; their gaze extends into the Astral and Ethereal planes


Charriot

Erdlus are herd beasts raised by many different cultures on Athas. These large, flightless birds stand up to seven feet tall and weigh around 200 pounds.

Their omnivorous diet allows them to graze nearly anywhere and their hardy nature keeps them alive in harsh terrain. The price of a single erdlu can be as much as double that listed or as little as half, depending upon availability. Erdlu’s eggs are also edible: one egg can fetch 3 bits.


The Wander

I live in a world of fire and sand. The crimson sun scorches take life from anything that crawls or flies,
and storms of sand scour the foliage from the barren ground. Lightning strikes from the cloudless sky, and peals of thunder roll unexplained across the vast tablelands. Even the wind, dry and searing as a kiln, can kill a man with thirst.

This is a land of blood and dust, where tribes of feral elves sweep out of the salt plains to plunder lonely caravans, mysterious singing winds call men to slow suffocation in a Sea of Silt, and legions of slaves clash over a few bushels of moldering grain. The dragon despoils entire cities, while selfish kings squander their armies raising gaudy palaces and garish tombs. This is my home, Athas. It is an arid and bleak place, a wasteland with a handful of austere cities clinging precariously to a few scattered oases. It is a brutal and savage land, beset by political strife and monstrous abominations, where life is grim and short.

Athas is a desert—sun-scorched and windscoured, parched and endless. From the first moments of dawn until the last twinkling of dusk, the crimson sun shimmers in the olive-tinged sky like a fiery puddle of blood. It climbs toward its zenith and the temperature rises relentlessly: 100 degrees by midmorning, 110 at noon, 130—sometimes even 150—by late afternoon.

A man cannot drink fast enough to replenish the fluids he loses. As the days drag on, he feels sick and feeble. If he does not have enough water, he grows too weak to move. His mouth becomes dry and bitter, his lips, tongue, and throat grow swollen. Before long, his blood is thick and gummy. His heart must work hard to circulate it. Finally his system overheats, leaving him dead and alone in the sands.

The wind does little to help matters. As hot as a
forge’s breath, it blows up sandstorms that last 50
days at a stretch, speeding the evaporation of water
from skin and soil alike. A storm can darken the sky
at high noon, carrying so much sand that it reduces
visibility to a pace.

Breezes on Athas are suffocating and dust-laden,
caking everything they touch with yellow-orange silt, spoiling food, and filling a man’s eyes with pasty mud. Even still days are perilous. Columns of superheated air can rush upward in terrific whirlwinds, carrying dust, plants, and men to great
heights—then suddenly dying away and leaving
their reluctant passengers to fall to a horrible death.

As dangerous as it is, the wind is merely an inconvenience when compared to the greatest danger of Athas the lack of water. In most places, it rains no more than once a year. In some places it only rains once in ten years, and the only available water lies in brackish, minerai-crusted oasis ponds. Aside from a handful of streams that trickle less than fifty miles before drying up, there is not a single river on the planet—though I have crossed plenty of ancient
bridges and know that rivers were once common. What the world was like in those days, I cannot imagine.

I have already noted what the lack of water can mean to a thirsty man, but the dry climate affects Athas in other ways. It allows the sun to shine down unreflected on the barren ground, which is why it grows so hot during the day.

At night, the low humidity has the opposite effect. The day’s heat escapes into the sky, plunging the temperature to 40 degrees or less—and in the mountains, even to zero.

As far I as can tell, all parts of Athas share the blazing sun, the dangerous winds, and the lack of water. Nothing I have seen in my own explorations or heard from the hundreds of travelers I have interviewed points to any other conclusion. Athas is an endless wasteland, spotted by tiny oases of fecundity, inhabited by brutal predators. It is, for all intents and purposes, a land of mortal desolation.

Though the picture I have painted so far is of a stark and rugged land, I do not mean to say that Athas is dreary or monotonous. To the contrary, it has a majestic and stark beauty. When first light casts its emerald hues over the Sea of Silt, or when sunset spreads its bloody stain over the Ringing Mountains, there is a certain feral beauty that stirs the untamed heart in all of us. It is a call to take up spear and net, to flee the city, to go and see what lurks out in the barrenness.

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